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Nov 27, 2019

   

Industry News

21C Metals is tapping into battery used for cleaner vehicle technology

2  MIN READ

The company is focused on palladium and cobalt, two crucial metals for the 21st Century

As the world moves toward a lower-carbon economy, responsible mining projects providing the metals needed to produce batteries, catalytic converters and other technology required to reduce vehicle greenhouse gas emissions will become increasingly critical.

According to the International Energy Agency, in 2018, there were roughly five million electric cars globally, up two million in just one year and almost doubling the amount of new electric car sales year-over-year.

China is still the world’s largest electric car market, followed by Europe and the United States. With millions of electric vehicles coming into circulation, the need for new batteries is increasing. Fast. All of the new batteries coming to the market will also need to be manufactured in some way or another using mined metals.

Meanwhile, the European Union and China are tightening standards for vehicle emissions, requiring even better exhaust cleaning technologies. With all of this in mind, which battery metals are best suited for producing the cleanest and most efficient batteries?

Canadian mining exploration company, 21C Metals Inc (CSE: BULL, FRA: DCR1, OTCQB: DCNNF), has the answer. The company is well-positioned to thrive in that marketplace, with a proven management team and a pair of promising properties in Ontario and the Czech Republic.

We are in the business of metals of the future. Demand is going up greatly for palladium, cobalt, copper and nickel because we are transitioning from conventional internal combustion to hybrids to electrics.

– Garry Clark, director, 21C Metals Inc.

The company’s East Bull Palladium property is located near mining-friendly Sudbury, Ontario. Their recent sampling program illustrates the potential to increase the inferred resource of 11.1 million tons at 1.46 g/t Palladium Equivalent (PdEq) for a total estimate of 523,000 ounces of PdEq.

When 21C picked up the property, palladium was trading at $1,300 an ounce; now it’s increased to $1750